Writer's Flow

Just another writer going with the flow

Posts tagged Awesome

227 notes &

uispeccoll:

The Zine Machine is a collaborative project between the University of Iowa Libraries, students at the University of Iowa, the Art Education Department at the University of Iowa, and zinesters all over the world.
We accept zines, mini-comics, and small artists’ books for submission. Zines up to 5 ½ x 8 ½ can be accommodated. Your submission may be featured on our website and will be archived in the University of Iowa’s Zine Collection in Special Collections.
If you would like to send us a submission please send it to:
Zine Machine c/o Kelly McElroy 100 Main Library Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1420
If you have questions or comments, please contact Kelly McElroy.
See this on the University of Iowa Libraries page.

uispeccoll:

The Zine Machine is a collaborative project between the University of Iowa Libraries, students at the University of Iowa, the Art Education Department at the University of Iowa, and zinesters all over the world.

We accept zines, mini-comics, and small artists’ books for submission. Zines up to 5 ½ x 8 ½ can be accommodated. Your submission may be featured on our website and will be archived in the University of Iowa’s Zine Collection in Special Collections.

If you would like to send us a submission please send it to:

Zine Machine
c/o Kelly McElroy
100 Main Library
Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1420

If you have questions or comments, please contact Kelly McElroy.

See this on the University of Iowa Libraries page.

Filed under zines Iowa reading awesome writing submissions comics

5,161 notes &

erikkwakkel:

The book that emerged from a bog after 1200 years

This is the remarkable story of a medieval book that spent 1200 years in the mud. Around 800 someone had a Book of Psalms made, a portable copy fitted with a leather satchel. The book consisted of sixty sheets of parchment that were carefully filled with handwritten words. Somehow the book ended up in a remote bog at Faddan More in north Tipperary, close to the town of Birr, Ireland. Dropped, perhaps, by the owner? Was he walking and reading at the same time? Did he himself also end up in the bog?

Fast-forward to 2006. Eddie Fogarty, the operator of a turf digger, noticed an object with faint lettering in the bucket of his machine (pic 1). There it was again, our Book of Psalms! At this point it resembled something from an Aliens movie (pic 2), but that changed quickly after it went to the restoration lab. Thanks to the conservation properties of turf, many pages were still intact, as was its leather satchel (pic 3), the only surviving specimen from this early period. Remarkably, among the damaged pages were some that had let go of the words: kept together merely by ink, the words were floating around by themselves - like some sort of medieval Scrabble (pic 4). It’s the most remarkable bookish survival story I know.

More on this phenomenal find in this news article and this one. Here is the bog and the machine that dug up the book More on the restoration process here. More about the papyrus found in the binding here. This is a nice movie on the book.

(via marginallymusing)

Filed under books history treasure Book of Psalms Ireland awesome words

2,345 notes &

erikkwakkel:

Shakespeare’s handwriting - and why it matters
Studying ancient handwriting is a fascinating thing. To know that the oddly-shaped letters on the page were put there hundreds of years ago by an individual with a life, passions and things to do, can be sensational. Sometimes such ancient handwritten notes can teach us really important things. The page above was written by no other than William Shakespeare. A scholar in Texas compared the document to a handwritten addition in a copy of Thomas Kyd’s play Spanish Tragedy. And what turned out to be the case? The handwriting in the image above is the same as in the added text in Kyd’s play. Moreover, the two share the same spelling pattern. Ergo, the two were written by the same individual - Shakespeare. The newly identified “text” by Shakespeare (an addition of several hundreds of lines) will be included in The Bard’s new edition. It’s extremely satisfying to an expert of old script (as I am) that letter shapes proved vital for this important discovery.
Read all about it in this NYT article.

erikkwakkel:

Shakespeare’s handwriting - and why it matters

Studying ancient handwriting is a fascinating thing. To know that the oddly-shaped letters on the page were put there hundreds of years ago by an individual with a life, passions and things to do, can be sensational. Sometimes such ancient handwritten notes can teach us really important things. The page above was written by no other than William Shakespeare. A scholar in Texas compared the document to a handwritten addition in a copy of Thomas Kyd’s play Spanish Tragedy. And what turned out to be the case? The handwriting in the image above is the same as in the added text in Kyd’s play. Moreover, the two share the same spelling pattern. Ergo, the two were written by the same individual - Shakespeare. The newly identified “text” by Shakespeare (an addition of several hundreds of lines) will be included in The Bard’s new edition. It’s extremely satisfying to an expert of old script (as I am) that letter shapes proved vital for this important discovery.

Read all about it in this NYT article.

(via marginallymusing)

Filed under i'm drooling handwriting LIT history mauscript Brain science Shakespeare awesome

12,274 notes &

heyteenbookshey:

annetdonahue:


A 40-year-old orangutan has developed an unnerving obsession with Pride & Prejudice. 
Albert, a 200lb (91kg) primate reads up to 50 pages a day of Austen’s book.
And he’s so gripped that unless he’s had at least half-an-hour of Elizabeth Bennet’s travails with Mr Darcy, he won’t sleep at night. 
Michael Krause, Albert’s keeper at Gdansk Zoo, in Poland, revealed: “Albert’s favourite book is Pride & Prejudice while his partner Raya likes German fiction. But they both like cookery books.
“When we’re doing dramatic readings they like me to act out all the movements.”
The bedtime stories came about because the pair would not settle down at night.
Mr Krause said: “If you gave them a fruit snack they’d throw it around, if you tried to wear them out with play, they’d just get hyper. “I didn’t know what to do until I pulled out a book I was reading during a break and within a couple of minutes they were trying to read over my shoulder. “Now they go to bed quietly and peacefully as long as they get their stories.”

This is all I care about now. Goodbye.

Everyone loves reading. -Allyx

heyteenbookshey:

annetdonahue:

A 40-year-old orangutan has developed an unnerving obsession with Pride & Prejudice. 

Albert, a 200lb (91kg) primate reads up to 50 pages a day of Austen’s book.

And he’s so gripped that unless he’s had at least half-an-hour of Elizabeth Bennet’s travails with Mr Darcy, he won’t sleep at night. 

Michael Krause, Albert’s keeper at Gdansk Zoo, in Poland, revealed: “Albert’s favourite book is Pride & Prejudice while his partner Raya likes German fiction. But they both like cookery books.

“When we’re doing dramatic readings they like me to act out all the movements.”

The bedtime stories came about because the pair would not settle down at night.

Mr Krause said: “If you gave them a fruit snack they’d throw it around, if you tried to wear them out with play, they’d just get hyper.
 
“I didn’t know what to do until I pulled out a book I was reading during a break and within a couple of minutes they were trying to read over my shoulder.
 
“Now they go to bed quietly and peacefully as long as they get their stories.”

This is all I care about now. Goodbye.

Everyone loves reading.
-Allyx

(Source: lordbyronsbloomers)

Filed under awesome reading books bookworms orangutan